Vast gelatinous areas aloft

In a rainstorm in Wilna, Lithuania, on April 4, 1846, nut-sized masses of a resinous and gelatinous substance fell, according to Comptes Rendus, 23-542. It was “odorless until burned: then it spread a very pronounced sweetish odor.” It was firmer than “gelatine,” but when in water for 24 hours, it “swelled out, and looked altogether gelatinous.” A similar substance fell in Asia Minor in 1841 and 1846.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 47-48 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Always the illusion of the final

The Journal of the Asiatic Society of Bengal, 1847-pt. 1-193 records a fall of an olive-gray powder at Shanghai on March 16, 1846. Under the microscope, it was “seen to be an aggregation of hairs of two kinds, black ones and rather thick white ones.” When burned, they smelled of ammonia and burnt hair or feathers.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 59 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

A great quantity of corpuscles

Fort quotes a story in Comptes Rendus, 23-832, about a tremendous red rain in France, Oct. 16 and 17, 1846. The explanation was that the rain was colored by matter swept up from the earth’s surface and then precipitated. But a later issue of the journal, 24-625, described the rain as “so vividly red and so blood-like that many persons in France were terrified.” A chemist who analyzed the matter noted “a great quantity of corpuscles–whether blood-like corpuscles or not,” while another set down organic matter at 35%.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p251 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).