Coincidences multiply

On June 9, 1866, according to Rept. B. A., 1867-430, a tremendous explosion occurred over Knysahinya, Hungary, and “about a thousand stones” fell from the sky.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p. 451 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

The new prophet who had appeared upon the moon

Strange changes were reported to an isolated object in the eastern part of the moon’s Mare Serenitatis, known as Linne. Before October 1866, Linne was well-known as a dark object. On Dec. 14, 16, 25 and 27 of 1866, Linne was seen as a white spot. “But,” Fort writes, “there was something that had the seeming more of a design, or of a pattern, an elaboration upon the mere turning to white of something that had been black.” Sunlight seemed to have nothing to do with its changing appearance. (The Student, 1-261; Rept. B. A., 1867-22)

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p. 428 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Taking up the subject theologically

The astronomer Schmidt reported that, on October 16, 1866, the isolated object on the moon called Linne, in the eastern part of the Mare Sereniatatis, hitherto a dark object, was becoming whiter.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p427 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

A better, or more unscrupulous, orthodoxy

Black rains fell at Slains, Scotland between 1863 and 1866, a total of eight in all. After two of these, writes Fort, “vast quantities of a substance described sometimes as ‘pumice stone,’ but sometimes as ‘slag,’ were washed upon the sea coast near Slains…Whatever it may have been the quantity of this substance was so enormous that, in Mr. Rust’s opinion [Rev. James Rust, Scottish Showers],  to have produced so much of it would have required the united output of all the smelting works in the world.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p29-30 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Their unison of movement

In 1866, lights seen against the sky were reported on the coast of England, around Durham. As reported in the London Times, Jan. 8, 1866, an inquiry was launched, headed by Admiral Collinson. “The mysterious lights,” as they were described, were “considerably elevated above the ground.” No conclusion was reached. As Fort said, the ‘false lights of Durham’ were “unaffected by the investigation.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p296 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974)