Our notion of cargoes

According to the Annual Register, 1832-447, the fields of Kourianof, Russia, saw a fall of a combustible, resinous,¬†yellowish substance which, when torn, had the tenacity of cotton. It covered an area of 600 or 700 square feet to a depth of at least two inches. In water, it had the consistency of resin, and was described as being the color of amber, elastic and smelled like “prepared oil mixed with wax.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 63 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

An earthy, insipid taste

Loud noises were heard in the sky, and stones fell from the sky, accompanied by a yellow powder that fell at Gerace, Calabria, on March 14, 1813. It had “an earthy, insipid taste,” described as “unctuous.” The Annals of Philosophy, 11-466, described one of the components as “a greenish-yellow substance, which, when dried, was found to be resinous.”

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 27 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Numerous globules

A fall of a yellow substance at Genoa, Italy, on Feb. 14, 1870 was reported in Jour. Franklin Inst., 90-11, by Director Boccardo of the Technical Institute of Genoa and Professor Castellani. Under a microscope, the substance revelaed numerous globules of cobalt blue, and “corpuscles of a pearly color that resembled starch,” according to Nature, 2-166.

–Charles Fort, The Book of the Damned, p. 26 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).