Develop Your Spiritual Side with 30 Minutes of Morning Reading

As you've learned, the point of meditation is to focus your mind and spirituality is a pursuit toward achieving a higher purpose for your life. One way to further increase these overarching goals is to create a morning routine. This is a time when you first wake up, before you start your day, in which you reflect upon your goals and take time to consider the things that are most important to you. This practice allows you to fully get in touch with yourself and to establish a positive mindset for the day ahead. An important part of this ritual is morning reading. As I've noted in this series, reading and research are essential components to a successful spiritual pursuit. Read on to discover how to develop your spiritual side with 30 minutes of morning reading, along with some insight on how to structure that time.

How to Find the Time

Most of us lead pretty busy lives. It can be hard to carve out even a few moments for ourselves during the day, let alone a half hour to read and some additional time for spiritual reflection of other types. And if you're already not a morning person? Well, you might think this goal is an impossible task. However, once you begin to experience a morning routine and its benefits, you'll likely start to do all you can to make the time for it. Until then, let me give you a few suggestions to try to help you make the transition as easy as possible. First, you'll need to wake up earlier. This is essential for nearly anyone wishing to establish a morning reading habit. It's not likely you can find an extra hour in your current wake-up routine, though you could try to adjust your regular habits to try to make it happen. To help you wake up at an earlier hour, you may want to push some of your usual early activities another time. For example, you could start taking your shower in the evening or wait until your lunch break to catch up on your emails. A little creativity and tweaking should give you plenty of time for this new practice.

What to Read

Next, you may wonder what types of material you should read. Honestly? Anything, really. The simple act of starting your day with words is a way to renew your spirit and to spark your enthusiasm for the hours ahead of you. Some choices may work better than others, depending on your specific desired outcome of this ritual. If you want to relax your state of mind and recharge your creativity, getting lost in a fictional story might do the trick. Many folks find non-fiction to be more suited to their spiritual pursuits. Reading about topics such as productivity hacks, a particular hobby or interest, a new skill you'd like to learn or a certain philosophical school of thought might start your day off on an introspective track. This can prompt you to look for additional self-growth opportunities throughout the next several hours.

Benefits of Morning Reading

The benefits of morning reading are vast. First of all, it gives you a break and is a form of self-care. It's not often we treat ourselves to downtime. Even the act of scheduling a leisure activity itself can be stressful. Building this time into your morning will soon become second nature, and it has powerful implications for your well-being. Plus, reading can be incredibly motivational and inspiring. When you come across ideas that excite you in a particular book, you're likely to take that sense of enthusiasm with you throughout your day. Finally, reading is a form of meditation. It focuses your mind, and you're no longer letting your thoughts wander to the worries in your world. Thus, the benefits are quite similar to spending a half hour meditating.

Do you have an idea now of just what carving out 30 minutes in your morning to read can do for you? It's a part of a greater spiritual routine that offers many rewards.

Reading About Creative and Positive Thinkers is Inspirational

Young Living Founder D. Gary Young

In previous posts, I’ve mentioned how important it is to get and stay inspired. We’ve also talked about how learning new things will help keep our minds sharp and how it helps us think creatively. Today, we’re going to combine these two ideas and talk about the benefits of reading about creative and positive thinkers.

There are so many amazing people living today and who have lived in the past that we can learn from. It doesn’t matter if you’re admiring the foresight and creativity of technology gurus like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, or Mark Zuckerberg, if you admire ancient thinkers like Plato and Aristotle, or anyone in between. There are many great thinkers and inspiriting people out there, and you should be reading about them.

Head to your local library, bookstore, or favorite online bookseller and look for books written by or about your favorite big thinkers. Make it a habit to learn a little more about them each month.

If they are current big thinkers, read their blogs, watch the videos they publish, or follow them on social media. Get your hands on anything you can and pay attention to how they think and how they share information. You know you’re striking gold when you get a glimpse of their daily habits and what they do to encourage creative thinking.

Not only will you learn a lot directly from reading about these people, you’ll also get and stay inspired to do your best on this journey towards creative and positive thinking of your own. Very early on in this series, I told you that you can do what you think you can do.

It’s a great motto to live by and something that definitely holds true. The only problem is that it can also limit us. If we don’t think we can do something or haven’t even considered the possibility that we might be able to do something, we won’t be able to do it. That’s why it’s important to read about other big thinkers.

They open our eyes, expand our horizons, and show us what’s possible. Look at some of the advances we’ve made in technology over the past 100 years. If you lived a century ago, you could not possibly have imagined ideas like blogs and social media, high speed internet and video conferencing, or little devices like smartphones that hold entire libraries and allow us to communicate at the touch of a button. No matter how creative of a thinker you may have been, you couldn’t possibly have thought about these ideas… and with that they were out of your realm of possibility to reach.

When you read about and learn from other big thinkers, it opens your mind to what’s possible. Study them, follow them, learn from them, and most importantly, be inspired by them.

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The sheep-panic of 1888

On Nov. 3, 1888, about 8 p.m. near Reading, Berkshire, flocks of sheep in a tract of land 25 miles long and 8 miles wide were affected by some simultaneous impulse, according to Symons’ Meteorological Magazine and the London Times, Nov. 20, 1888. Thousands of sheep burst from their pens and were found widely scattered the next morning, “some of them still panting with terror under hedges, and many crowded into corners of fields.”

Another panic occurred the next year in Berkshire, not far from Reading.

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p490 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).

Consternation in Reading

The Nov. 23, 1905 London Times reported that a man and his gamekeeper at East Liss, Hants., 40 miles from Reading, heard “a loud, distant rumbling” which seemed to be “a composition of triplets of sounds” on Nov. 17 about 3:30 p.m. The gamekeeper had heard similar sounds at 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. They were “not like gunfire.” According to the Reading Standard, the sounds “closely resembled those that had been heard during the meteoric shower of 1866.”

–Charles Fort, New Lands, p499 (The Complete Books of Charles Fort, Dover, c1974).